09/22/2017

Half of Canadians aged 20 and over have a chronic condition and 15 per cent have two or more. The annual cost to Canada’s economy of lost productivity due to chronic disease is around $122 billion, equivalent to about six percent of Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP). While governments, employers and advocacy organizations have good intentions and are undertaking helpful initiatives, the challenge is immense and it requires a well-informed, broad, integrated response.

This report is based on two main sources of data: interviews with key stakeholders and a review of the related literature to identify how Canadians living with chronic conditions could work without needing to choose between working without supports or leaving the workforce. It provides a broad overview of the issues concerning chronic conditions in the workplace and supports the development of public policy and interventions to assist those with chronic conditions. 

To read or print the report, click the PDF icon in the box above.

The report is also available on Medium and can be read here.

Roundtable on the Future of the Bio-Based Economy in Canada

When: Monday, May 11, 2009 - 09:30 - 16:00

Where: National Arts Centre, Ottawa

The bio-based economy is a driver of innovation and key contributor to Canada’s social, economic, and environmental well-being, through the application of biological tools and processes to the production of  food, energy, chemicals, treatments, diagnostics, and materials.  Yet, it faces a number of challenges, including attracting investment, commercializing new technologies, and attracting and retaining qualified workers. Meanwhile, other countries are investing aggressively in biotechnology, pioneering innovative partnerships between industry and academia, and building the fiscal and regulatory environments in which biotechnology can flourish.

On May 11, 2009, the Public Policy Forum convened experts from industry, academia, and governments for a multi-stakeholder dialogue on the opportunities and challenges facing the bio-based economy in Canada. Expert speakers in the morning discussed how various sectors of the bio-economy are managing through the economic crisis; they identified priorities for action to maintain and increase the economic competitiveness of the bio-economy; and they shared ideas on how the bio-based economy could contribute to Canada’s economic recovery and long-term prosperity.  This set the stage for a deliberative session in the afternoon in which participants considered the framework proposed in BIOTECanada’s blueprint document Beyond Moose and Mountains: Building the World’s Leading Bio-Based Economy, as a starting point for discussion.

Thanks to our sponsors

PPF Names Award for Frank McKenna

PPF Names Award for Frank McKenna

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11/21/2017

OTTAWA, NOV. 21, 2017 -– The Public Policy Forum is pleased to announce that it has named its annual award for outstanding contributions to public policy by Atlantic Canadians in honour of Frank McKenna, one of the region’s most accomplished leaders. The Frank McKenna Award for Leadership in Public Policy will be presented to individuals who have made substantial contributions to public policy debate and decisions in one of the four Atlantic provinces, the overall region or nationally.

“Frank has been the indefatigable champion of New Brunswick and Atlantic Canada for more than 30 years,” says Edward Greenspon, President and CEO of the Public Policy Forum. “Wherever he is and whatever he does, he never loses sight of his responsibility to the region that shaped him.”

“Our policy award in Western Canada is named in honour of Peter Lougheed. Frank is his eastern counterpart in putting place before politics.”

Since 2013, the PPF has presented awards to distinguished Atlantic Canadians who have built bridges between sectors, contributed to public policy and shown exceptional leadership. Previous honourees include the Hon. Margaret Norrie McCain, the Hon. Myra Freeman, Tom Traves and Aldéa Landry. Nominations for the 2018 awards are being accepted until Nov. 30, 2017.

“The world is rapidly transforming, presenting both opportunity and challenge for Atlantic Canada,” says Frank McKenna. “We must continue to develop public policy that ensures our region and future generations are set up for success. To this end, it's vital we recognize and celebrate those who influence and implement policies that help us live better lives today and down the road.”

Mr. McKenna is the Deputy Chair of TD Bank Group, a three-term Premier of New Brunswick and Canada’s former ambassador to the United States. He is sought out widely for his leadership and knowledge of both the private and public sector.

The awards will be presented on March 21, 2018 in Fredericton, New Brunswick during the first PPF Atlantic Summit & Frank McKenna AwardsThe day-long Summit, which Mr. McKenna will attend, is the first public event of the PPF’s new three-year research project on immigration and retention in Atlantic Canada. Mr. McKenna will speak at the awards dinner in the evening.

ABOUT THE PPF

The Public Policy Forum works with all levels of government and the public service, the private sector, Indigenous groups, labour, post-secondary institutions and NGOs to improve policy outcomes for Canadians. As a non-partisan, member-based organization, we work from "inclusion to conclusion," by convening discussions on fundamental policy issues and by identifying new paths forward. For 30 years, the PPF has broken down barriers among sectors, contributing to meaningful change that builds a better Canada.

For more information and media inquiries

Carl Neustaedter

Director of Communications
Public Policy Forum
CNeustaedter@ppforum.ca
613.238.7858 ext. 286
Mobile: 613.866.7210

Jonathan Perron-Clow

Communications Specialist
Public Policy Forum
JPerron-Clow@ppforum.ca
613.238.7858 ext. 224
Mobile: 613.806.4967

 

 

For more information, visit www.ppforum.ca or follow us on Twitter: @ppforumca

Call for proposals now up

Call for proposals now up

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11/07/2017

MONTREAL, NOV. 7, 2017 – The Marcel Côté Award for Leadership in Public Policy will be presented to three deserving honourees being recognized for their extraordinary leadership and contribution to public policy and public discourse at a ceremony in Montreal. The honourees are:

·         Matthew Coon Come, Former Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees

·         Nadine St-Louis, Founder and Executive Director of Sacred Fire Productions

·         Gabriel Bran Lopez, Founding President of Youth Fusion, André-Yanne Parent and the First Nations and Inuit Programming Team at Youth Fusion

When: Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Hydro Québec Agora, Heart of Sciences at UQAM, 175 President Kennedy Ave., Montreal

Marcel Côté was an economist and founding partner of SECOR Inc., which he helped build into Canada’s largest independent management consulting firm. His advice was sought by corporations, community and cultural organizations, as well as senior-level governments in our country. The Marcel Côté Award was named in his honour in 2015 and is being given out for the third time.

News media are welcome to cover the event. Please contact us to register.

-30-

For more information AND media inquiries

Jonathan Perron-Clow

Communications Specialist
Public Policy Forum
jperron-clow@ppforum.ca
613.238.7858 ext. 224
Mobile: 613.806.4967

 

 

 

11/06/2017

OTTAWA, NOV. 6, 2017 – Economic reconciliation is not only the fair and right thing to do, but there’s a strong business case for it as well. Canada’s economy would grow by $27.7 billion annually if barriers preventing Indigenous Canadians from participating in the Canadian economy were removed, according to a recent report by the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board.

The Public Policy Forum is hosting a conference on Métis Economic Reconciliation on Nov. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the University of Winnipeg’s Convocation Hall with an exciting agenda.

This conference focuses on creating and increasing economic opportunities for the Métis Nation and igniting the next generation of Métis entrepreneurship.

The Public Policy Forum is pleased to partner with the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada to deliver the second in a three-part series of conferences on reconciliation and inclusive economic growth.

Can’t make it to the event? Watch the conference live starting at 9 a.m. Central / 10 a.m. Eastern on the PPF YouTube channel.

-          To get a notification when the live stream starts, subscribe to our channel.

-          To watch the first conference in the Expanding the Circle series, click here.

News media are welcome to cover the event. Please contact us to register.

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ABOUT THE PPF

The Public Policy Forum works with all levels of government and the public service, the private sector, Indigenous groups, labour, post-secondary institutions and NGOs to improve policy outcomes for Canadians. As a non-partisan, member-based organization, we work from "inclusion to conclusion," by convening discussions on fundamental policy issues and by identifying new paths forward. For 30 years, the PPF has broken down barriers among sectors, contributing to meaningful change that builds a better Canada.

For more information AND media inquiries

Carl Neustaedter

Director of Communications
Public Policy Forum
cneustaedter@ppforum.ca
613.238.7858 ext. 286
Mobile: 613.866.7210

 

 

 

Finding Legitimacy in Government: A Path to Reconciliation

When: Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - Thursday, November 30, 2017

Where: Regina

Legitimacy and Reconciliation in Canada

The Public Policy Forum is taking part in a global project, coordinated by The Centre for Public Impact in the United Kingdom, to explore the concept of legitimacy in government. The Public Policy Forum is one of seven organizations that will explore the concept of legitimacy; each country has adopted a different theme.

On Nov. 29 and 30, the PPF is partnering with the First Nations University of Canada and the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy to engage young Indigenous people in a conversation about legitimacy in government in the context of reconciliation for the Canadian conversation.

What does a reconciled relationship look like? How will we achieve this relationship? Does the Canadian government have the legitimacy it needs to achieve true reconciliation? Using an innovative “unconference” approach, participants will consider these questions as well as the:

·       The extent to which the Government of Canada has the legitimacy to deliver on its commitments to Indigenous peoples;

·       What actions the Government of Canada could take to enhance its legitimacy and promote transparency and trust;

·       The means/processes that could be established to strengthen transparency and trust between the Government of Canada and Indigenous peoples; and

·       How to better engage all Indigenous peoples – in particular, emerging leaders - in a meaningful dialogue on legitimacy and reconciliation.

 

For the purposes of this project, legitimacy in government is defined as “the reservoir of support that allows governments to deliver positive outcomes for people."

Contact Rhonda Moore, Policy Lead, at rmoore@ppforum.ca for more information.

 

Thank you to our project partners:

Johnson Shoyama Graduate School Logo First Nations University Logo
Government of Canada Logo Centre for Public Impact logo
   

 

Listen in as Ed Greenspon chats cities

Listen in as Ed Greenspon chats cities

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